Agenda

Oct
14
sam
Surf Craft – Benefit Auction @ Paddle 8
Oct 14 @ 0 h 00 min – Oct 21 @ 20 h 00 min

Since 2013, Juxtapoz has teamed with Waves For Water, a non-profit organization founded by pro surfer Jon Rose that is committed to bringing portable water filters to provide clean water for areas of the world in desperate need. With the devastating hurricanes that have hit Puerto Rico in September 2017, Juxtapoz has once again teamed with Waves For Water for another series of « Surf Craft » surfboards that will be auctioned off to support the non-profits efforts for Puerto Rico relief. We will also be working with the Changing Tides Foundation as part of our 2017 fundraising.

Our efforts with our friends at Chandran Gallery will bring together original art on surfboards by Marcel Dzama, Jules de Balincourt, Paul Wackers, Todd James, Austin Lee, Pat Berren, Christian Rex van Minnen (video below), Cody Hoyt, Thomas Campbell, Kindah Khalidy, Timothy Curtis, Sam Friedman, Benjamin Keating and Kristin Farr!

The auction will go live on Paddle8 on October 14th, 2017, with a special exhibition of boards at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City from October 14—21, 2017.

Oct
21
sam
Opening: Kenny Scharf – Inner and Outer Space @ Jeffrey Deitch (New York)
Oct 21 @ 12 h 00 min – Oct 22 @ 6 h 00 min

Kenny Scharf: Inner and Outer Space

October 21 – December 22, 2017
18 Wooster Street

The faces are melting in Kenny Scharf’s new paintings. “Things are disintegrating,” he says, “I am reacting to our increasingly out-of-control situation.” Scharf’s work continues to be infused by his inexhaustible optimism and his sense of fun but there has always been an engagement with profound issues beneath the façade. Ecology, the environment, and capitalist excess have long been central themes. More recently, his paintings have shown his alarm over the effects of petroleum and the mountains of nondegradable plastic that are produced from it.

Scharf’s work has always combined and contrasted the pop culture he absorbed growing up in Los Angeles with the important innovations in modern and contemporary art. His earlier work fused Dali and Disney. More recently, he has been in dialogue with Pollock and Abstract Expressionism. In the new work, he merges his distinct style with color field and stain painting. “I like to connect with every movement in 20th-century art,” Scharf explains. “I make new hybrids, taking it all in and putting it in a blender.”

A distinctive style is something that Scharf admires in other artists and from the beginning has tried to achieve in his own work. He believes in art as an expression of individual identity. From his first mature work as a student at the School of Visual Arts, a painting by Kenny Scharf was instantly recognizable. Still adhering to his signature style, he continuously invents new forms.

Scharf is very enthusiastic about his new “sloppy style” that characterizes the major paintings in the exhibition. Rows of faces disintegrate into colorful drips reminiscent of both New York School painting and the serial imagery of minimal art. In these new works, Scharf is striving to create clear and simple forms that resonate with meaning. He feels liberated and excited, adding that “it is so much fun.”
The expression of emotion in art is essential to Scharf. Art that is cold leaves him cold. He explains that cartoon faces can express emotion with abstract power. Like his artistic colleagues from his early years in New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, Scharf studied cartoons as a way to intensify figurative expression.

It is his early downtown history that brings Scharf back to New York this October. The Museum of Modern Art is opening an exhibition on the seminal performance space Club 57 in which Scharf played a central role. Watching him paint, one can see how his experience as a backup dancer for Klaus Nomi and his other performative roles have shaped his approach to his work. One side of his painting practice is detailed and meticulous to the extreme. The other side is tremendously physical and requires him to use his body like a dancer.

Visitors to Scharf’s Los Angeles studio are greeted by a hundred or more discarded plastic toys in his yard and on his roof. During the early part of his career, Scharf found his art materials in the garbage. To this day, he still stops his car when he finds plastic toys and TV sets thrown away on the street. These discarded plastic objects have inspired the two other bodies of work featured in the show: his Assemblage Vivant Tableaux Plastiques, and his TV Bax. The assemblage works, which are inspired by the Nouveau Realistes, are constructed from his stock of recycled plastic toys. The TV Bax are painted on the plastic backs of discarded television sets. Like the toys, the TV backs have a disconcerting anthropomorphic quality. Scharf wonders if their anonymous designers created these plastic covers, which are different for every model, to resemble a face.

Scharf finds these thrown-away toys and TV backs to be poignant objects, resonant with emotion. “Each of these objects carries a story,” Scharf explains. He thinks about how people might have struggled and sacrificed to buy these toys and TVs, and about the intense relationship that children and families have with them. Scharf resurrects the lives of these inanimate objects in his work. He also notes that garbage keeps changing with technology. The backs of TV sets used to have large protruding “noses.” Now they are flatter and more similar to a canvas.

Since his childhood, Scharf has been fascinated by outer space. Space travel and the portrayal of infinite space have long been central themes. In his life and in his work, he tries to eliminate boundaries and borders. As he pursues his dialogue with the great painters of the New York School, he is increasingly preoccupied with the inner space of painting. His exploration of inner space creates a dynamic tension with his passion for outer space. With his characteristic exuberance and his moral voice, Scharf reformulates his unique combination of Pollock and Pop to create a vibrant new body of work.

 

Oct
26
jeu
Opening: Nelio – Passages @ Galerie Slika
Oct 26 @ 18 h 30 min – 21 h 30 min

Oct
27
ven
Opening: HuskMitNavn – Framework @ V1 Gallery II (Copenhague)
Oct 27 @ 17 h 00 min – 21 h 00 min

V1 GALLERY PRESENTS

Framework

A solo exhibition by HuskMitNavn

On view in V1 Gallery’s gallery II

OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY OCTOBER 27. 2017. TIME: 17.00 – 21.00
EXHIBITION PERIOD OCTOBER 28. – NOVEMBER 18. 2017.

Throughout his multidisciplinary career HuskMitNavn has actively explored the space between content and context. In sculpture, in site specific public and private murals and installations, in museum and gallery settings, in books and on digital platforms. He is a master at creating a dynamic relation between artwork, architecture and platform. Letting the setting and relation influence the content and vice versa. For several years he has actively engaged the digital application Instagram with hand drawn black line drawings. Using only A4 sized white paper, a black marker and a camera, he has created elaborate trompe l’oeil compositions (Instagram@huskmitnavn1).

In Framework HuskMitNavn challenges himself to reengage and reexamine the most basic artistic formats – paper and canvas. In 15 new works he lets frame and material play an active part in the composition. A wooden frame becomes the totem an unlucky explorer in a safari helmet is tied to awaiting his destiny in the boiling black pot (Dinner Time, 2017). Another wooden frame is eaten by the protagonist – a hungry beaver (The Beaver, 2017). In a series of intricate compositions on canvas, fictional stretcher bars are transformed to window frames in a play between background and foreground.

By twisting the framework for the simple materials, new ideas and possibilities arise. Drawings and paintings spread from canvas and paper and appropriate the frame into the artwork in unexpected and ingenious ways.
Framework is a playful exhibition challenging both artist and viewer.

HuskMitNavn (b.1975) lives and works in Copenhagen. HuskMitNavn has chosen to remain anonymous throughout his career as he would rather have people focus on his work instead of him. Interestingly HuskMitNavn has become one of the most recognized and celebrated contemporary Danish artists with more than a 100.000 followers around the globe on Instagram. He actively uses the medium to promote and instigate creativity. His artist books are being published around the world and his distinct socially conscious practice is resonating with a wide audience beyond Danish shores. He has recently exhibited at MIMA Museum, Brussels, Belgium, Heerup Museum, Rødovre, Denmark, Nordic Contemporary, Paris, France. Concurrently with Framework HuskMitNavn has created a second solo exhibition titled Work It that will be on display in V1 Gallery’s main gallery. Work It is an elaborate exhibition with 34 works on canvas, paper and a sculptural installation examining our contemporary work lifestyle. HuskMitNavn and V1 Gallery have collaborated for 15 years. Framework and Work It marks his 7th and 8th solo exhibitions with the gallery.

Opening: HuskMitNavn – Work It @ V1 Gallery (Copenhague)
Oct 27 @ 17 h 00 min – 21 h 00 min

V1 GALLERY PRESENTS

Work It 

A solo exhibition by HuskMitNavn

OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY OCTOBER 27. 2017. TIME: 17.00 – 21.00
EXHIBITION PERIOD OCTOBER 28. – NOVEMBER 18. 2017.

In the exhibition Work It HuskMitNavn engages our contemporary work lifestyle. In 34 new works on canvas, paper and a sculptural installation, we join the exhausted maid taking a rest on the freshly made hotel bed (Hotel Maid, 2017), the artist in her studio contemplating the first brush stroke (The Studio, 2017) and the White-collar worker caught in a cycle of endless meetings about efficiency (The Meeting, 2017). For all of them, it seems their work is taking up more and more time, to the point where work life seems to equal life itself.

HuskMitNavn comments: “Over the years our work has left the office buildings and workplaces and now it devours everything on its way. Your friends are no longer just your friends, they are also your network. Your half marathon is part of your CV and not only for your pain and pleasure. Your work emails become your holiday reading by the pool, so you won’t miss out while you’re gone.”

In Work it HuskMitNavn continues his heartfelt investigation of the dynamics of everyday life that has been at the heart of his practice from the outset. He engages and criticizes the social structures and norms that surrounds us and shapes our lives. He is never supercilious in his work, he is right there in the middle of it with us, making the right observations and the wrong decisions. He depicts the mundane absurdities, poetic moments and random routines we all go through to make it to the end of the day. The waiter takes a sip from the drink she is serving (The Drink, 2017), the train conductor whistles on as passengers and luggage tumble by (On The Train, 2017), and the pizza delivery boy enjoys a bit of tailwind on his bicycle (Pizza Boy, 2017). HuskMitNavn’s talent and courage is rare, few artists have continuously worked with mundane contemporary issues in the way HuskMitNavn has for the past 15 years.

In the new body of work it is often the children who force us to take a moment for pause or contemplation in our hectic daily grind. The girl who opens her book like a laptop next to her mother working extra hours by the kitchen table (Homework, 2017). The boy who curiously follows the work of the zoo keeper sweeping the chimpanzee cage (Zoo, 2017). The uncoorperative child who refuses to smile for the perfect family photo (Big Smile, 2017). The soaking wet but smiling kids walking through the rain with exhausted kindergarten teachers (Zebra Crossing, 2017). All protesting, in a subtle way, against the busyness implicit in how we live and act. Opposing the logic in propulsion for the sake of progress and advancement. They insist on space to simply live life, and not just being silent side kicks in a “professional” life.

HuskMitNavn explains: “Before I could make a living making art I had various jobs to make ends meet. I worked as a mailman, worked in homecare for the elderly and did various blue collar work. Back then, I was off work when I left my place of work. Now I have a job where everything around me could potentially be inspiration for a new work of art and my work day doesn’t have a clear and natural end. The new works are also a reminder to myself not to let my work engulf everything.”

HuskMitNavn (b.1975) lives and works in Copenhagen. HuskMitNavn has chosen to remain anonymous throughout his career as he would rather have people focus on his work instead of him. Interestingly HuskMitNavn has become one of the most recognized and celebrated contemporary Danish artists with more than a 100.000 followers around the globe on Instagram. He actively uses the medium to promote and instigate creativity. His artist books are being published around the world and it seems his distinct socially conscious practice is resonating with a wide audience beyond Danish shores. He has recently exhibited at MIMA Museum, Brussels, Belgium, Heerup Museum, Rødovre, Denmark, Nordic Contemporary, Paris, France.

Concurrently with Work It HuskMitNavn has created a second solo exhibition titled Frame Work that will be on display in V1 Gallery’s gallery II. Frame Work is an exploration beyond the traditional boundaries of the canvas and the frame. HuskMitNavn and V1 Gallery have collaborated for 15 years. Work it andFramework marks his 7th and 8th exhibition with the gallery.

Opening: Jeroen Erosie – Trust Fall @ Mini Galerie
Oct 27 @ 18 h 00 min – 21 h 00 min

28 October – 2 December 2017

Mini Galerie is proud to announce Trust Fall, the third solo exhibition by Dutch artist Jeroen Erosie with the gallery.

Trust Fall features a new series of paintings, collages and sketchbook pages, representing a quicker and more direct approach in Erosie’s artistic practice. The title is a personal reference to this newly established attitude towards his work, where the end effect of the paintings are based on an inner artistic confidence. Erosie believes in an iterative process, a step by step method involving a more trusting attitude. The result is a sharper, intuitive creation, allowing the geometry of his signature forms to speak for themselves. A selection of sketchbooks showing the evolution of ideas and sources of inspiration allow visitors to take a peek inside the creative process of the artist. They also serve as a reference point to the canvases themselves, demonstrating this new freedom within Erosie’s work.

Holding an honours degree from the renowned Willem de Kooning academy in Rotterdam, Jeroen Heeman (Roosendaal en Nispen 1976) combines his formal training with an alternative abstract style that invites the viewer into a discussion on public space and the role art plays within it. His work has been shown in multiple art festivals and shows across Europe, the United States, and Japan, establishing Erosie as an irrefutable contributor to the contemporary art scene.

For further information regarding Trust Fall please contact Julia van der Meer at info@minigalerie.nl.

Oct
28
sam
Opening: Machine Show @ Library Street Collective (Detroit)
Oct 28 @ 18 h 00 min – 20 h 00 min

MACHINE SHOW
1260 LIBRARY STREET, DETROIT

OCTOBER 28 – DECEMBER 23, 2017 
ARTIST RECEPTION SAT. OCTOBER 28, 6-8PM 

For a catalog, please contact info@lscgallery.com

Opening on October 28, Library Street Collective presents Machine Show, an exhibition exploring the innovative processes of painters Paul Kremer, Mark Flood, MOMO and Jason REVOK. Curated by Kremer, Machine Show will uncover the methodology behind the artists’ works, showing painting alongside video, performance, and functional objects. Whether made to spec or fashioned from available found materials, an artist’s tools can be definitive for a particular series of works, and even have the potential to drive an entire career. With the acceleration of production schedules, tools can be made and modified to offer expediency in practice, create a spectacle in performance, upend convention, or create an aesthetic that leaves the viewer wondering how a piece was made. In taking matters into their own hands, the act of creating unique tools can express dissatisfaction with the status quo, available methods, and with movements in art that came before. Whether analog or tech-based, it is the ultimate act of progress to design new methods of production.